Voices of New Economies: Mike Sandmel

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This blog is part of the 'Voices of New Economies' series within Cities for People - an experiment in advancing the movement toward urban resilience and livability through connecting innovation networks.

The Voices of New Economies series is collectively curated by One Earth and The Canadian CED Network.

This series is an exploration of what it takes to build the economies we need - ones that work for people, places, and the planet. We are connecting key actors, finding patterns, noting interesting differences, and highlighting key concepts and initiatives. Together, this series offers insights into the new economies movement as it develops.

What do we mean by "The New Economy" and what does it have to do with cities?

By Mike Sandmel MikeSandmel

It's important to be clear about the language we're using. Certainly there are new economic arrangements being formed in various places and at various scales, and those innovations are important to think about as we imagine the future economy. But when we talk about the "New Economy," we're talking about the next political and economic systems that we need to build to displace the dominant economic paradigm (a.k.a. corporatism, capitalism, neoliberalism... depending on who you're talking to) that is driving inequality, instability, and and ecological crisis worldwide. And we're trying to have that conversation in the context of social movement and economic history.

Key principles of the New Economy

As a network, New Economy Coalition is interested in pragmatic experimentation and is open to a range of perspectives when it comes to the details of exactly how such a system would work, but we're also united by some strong underlying principles.

  • We believe the New Economy needs to be restorative to people, place, and planet. That means getting beyond the kind of thinking that says we can grow our way out of problems at the expense of the natural capital and social capital on which our communities and our society depend.
  • We also believe the New Economy should operate according to principles of democracy, justice and appropriate scale. This means reclaiming the concept of the common good and introducing democracy into economic life from the local to the global, rather than concentrating power in the hands of political or corporate elites.
  • Finally, we believe in a just transition, which means we can't get to the New Economy we need without centering the leadership, needs, and vision of those who have been marginalized by the current extractive economy.

When we apply that lens to the real world, and look at the kinds of work that our members are doing, we see that the individual practices in the New Economy -- things like cooperation, democratic management of the commons, and more holistic views of wealth -- are not actually new at all. Yes, people are using technologies and legal innovations to make this stuff accessible to new audiences but ultimately we're building on practices that have been used by marginalized people for centuries as a means of survival and it's important to honor that.

How does this relate to cities?

Cities are, in so many cases, the fertile ground where seeds of a New Economy are starting to sprout. Here in the US, our federal government hasn't exactly built much of a reputation for being able to do bold and innovative things lately. On the other hand, we've been seeing really exciting developments in cities across the country. We often point to the impressive Evergreen Cooperatives in Cleveland, which are certainly worthy of the attention that they get but there's so much more happening. In Boston, where our main office is located, we've seen an incredible ecosystem of organizations in low-income communities come together to build a growing, affordable, largely community-owned sustainable food economy. In the capitol of Mississippi, Cooperation Jackson made community wealth building the defining issue of their mayoral campaign and are continuing to lead the charge.

In Buffalo New York, community organizers are engaged in a sophisticated campaign to redevelop their neighborhood while creating living wage jobs and building green permanently-affordable housing. In the city of Boulder, Colorado, campaigners recently won a huge victory driving out a private-utility owned coal plant and replacing it with a new green municipal energy utility.  The city of Chattanooga, in Tennessee, is now home to the nation's fastest internet speeds thanks to a municipally owned broadband network.

These are just a few of the more dramatic examples. We're also seeing major cities raising their minimum wages, divesting their pensions funds from the fossil fuel industry, investing in co-ops and community ownership, embracing participatory budgeting, and much much more.

To talk about system change and building a New Economy in the face of the stagnation and regression of our national politics may seem naive.  However, to call for anything less than system change in the face of urgent and growing social and ecological injustice would be insufficient. I'd argue that this is all the more reason to look toward cities as a critical place where radical demands can be met with pragmatic and transformative possibilities.

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Mike Sandmel is the Manager of Coalition Engagement for the New Economy Coalition. Raised by politically active Unitarian Universalists, Mike began organizing as a high school freshman working on a successful town wide living wage campaign. He graduated magna cum laude from New York University's Gallatin School of Individualized Study with an interdisciplinary BA in ecology and economics. He founded and managed the NYU Bike Share, the first ever bike-sharing program in New York City. He was a 2011 Morris K. Udall Scholar, an exchange student in political economy and economic history at Stockholm University, and authored an honors thesis entitled "Populism In The Anthropocene: A Study of Climate Change Politics at Occupy Wall Street.” He has served for two years on the steering committee of SustainUS, a youth-run NGO that advocates for sustainable development at the UN level. He has taken part in delegations to UN negotiations in Rio de Janeiro and Doha. His writing has appeared in Grist, Common Dreams, Waging Nonviolence, Nation Of Change, N+1, and Alternet as well as Andrew Revkin's "Dot Earth" blog for the New York Times.

 

Voices of New Economies: Sean Geobey

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This blog is part of the 'Voices of New Economies' series within Cities for People - an experiment in advancing the movement toward urban resilience and livability through connecting innovation networks. This Voices series is collectively curated by One Earth and The Canadian CED Network. We are launching Voices of New Economies as part of New Economy Week 2014, hosted by the New Economy Coalition. Throughout this week, a series of 5 questions guide our exploration of what it would take to build the economy we need - one that works for people, place, and planet.

Today’s Voices story responds to the fifth and final question in the New Economy Week series: How can we support neighborhoods, cities, towns, and regions as the fertile ground for the kind of economy we need?

Voices of New Economies - An Interview with Sean Geobey

By Nabeel Ahmed

When Sean Geobey was in university, he helped start up a community capacity building nonprofit. It introduced him to the challenges of how social service organizations financed their work, a question Voices_Sean Goebey_Piche has grappled with in his doctoral research at the University of Waterloo and the Waterloo Institute of Social Innovation and Resilience. His work on social finance looks at alternative funding models and how they can transform the social sector, private markets, and governments that encourage more inclusive, democratic, and real-wealth creating activities.

For Sean, real wealth comes from the things that allow us to better express ourselves; things that allow for individual talents and interests to flourish in a way that doesn't harm other people's capacity to do the same. That wealth, he says, comes from our capacity to invest materially, socially, and and intellectually in the creation of institutions and infrastructure that support collective efforts to try and make the world a better place.

What are some key elements of new economies?

"It's important, here, to take stock of the new economies we are drifting into and guide them towards the new economies we desire (which may have elements of the 'old' economies as well).

Increasingly, real wealth is being diminished by the commodification of human inputs and creativity. This is a world of increased automation, designed more by bits and data rather than the creation of actual goods and services. It is a globalized world, not just economically but also socially and culturally. There has been a troubling shift towards institutions that are fundamentally unaccountable to the general public and community; corporate actors that act with impunity across borders present a real challenge for the remaining democratic institutions to channel productive capacity towards broader positive impacts rather than just shareholders.

Despite the discontents, more flexibility does hold an incredible amount of promise, and technological advances can increase material well-being and creative potential.

Ultimately, new, resilient economies that better serve people will require a revitalization of democratic people-controlled institutions, from governments, to finance, to worker organizations, to company ownership and control. It means a better understanding of local environments and the increasing variety of people in them, learning from past institutions while creating new ones, in ways that can leverage advances in technology."

How can we support neighborhoods, cities, towns, and regions as the fertile ground for the kind of economy we need?

"At the local level, we have a real opportunity to revive and modernize this idea of a mutual aid driven society that was prevalent in the late 19th century.This includes the credit union sector, cooperatives, and craft unions, creating opportunities for people to support each other's work around the world. Such organizations can maintain autonomy while working together at a global scale, which large multinational corporations and the financial sector do quite well, but older models of mutual aid have historically struggled with.

This is where social finance comes in. Just as the prevalence of sophisticated, globalized financial tools has helped the modern economy develop, a more human-oriented way of social, economic, and ecological prosperity can come from getting regular people engaged with finance to help develop their own communities and support the work of like-minded people wherever they may be.

The credit union sector, for example, has been pushing for innovation in local economic development through various means, including the creation of community bonds. These are small investments created by nonprofits and social sector organizations, mostly administered by credit unions, that allow organizations without traditional access to debt financing to convert erstwhile donors into more substantial supporters in the form of a loan. This allows social sector organizations with real capital and assets to leverage value in a way they have not been able to do so previously.

Crowdfunding is the most obvious technology-driven social finance innovation, emerging in the last decade to allow an unprecedented global flow of capital from ordinary people. It has been particularly transformative in turning retail consumers into financiers; in the entertainment, music, film and video game industries, the pre-purchase model has allowed new people to produce interesting ideas and tell new stories that were impossible a few decades ago. As a pre-purchaser, you effectively give a loan to a producer, which completely changes the relationship between consumers and producers."

Through tapping into both local and global social finance tools, individuals can transform institutions to be more inclusive of people's creativity and fundamental dignity.

 

Voices of New Economies: Marianne Jurzyniec

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This blog is part of the 'Voices of New Economies' series within Cities for People - an experiment in advancing the movement toward urban resilience and livability through connecting innovation networks. This Voices series is collectively curated by One Earth and The Canadian CED Network. We are launching Voices of New Economies as part of New Economy Week 2014, hosted by the New Economy Coalition. Throughout this week, a series of 5 questions guide our exploration of what it would take to build the economy we need - one that works for people, place, and planet.

Today’s Voices story responds to the fourth question in the New Economy Week series: How do we transition to a renewable economy without leaving the workers, young people, and communities most impacted by extractive industries behind?

Inclusion in New Economies

By Marianne Jurzyniec, Governance Liaison Manager with Affinity Credit Union

When I envision New Economies…Marianne_Pic

I see engaged citizens with equal voices being the stewards of their communities and their world.

I see companies and organizations having their decisions made by the people who utilize and are impacted by them.

I see the urge to participate in new economies as second nature because the connection to each other and the planet is evident.

I see responsible consumerism because we are informed and educated in our decisions. Transparency is the norm not an exception.

I see values-based economies where collaboration is prominent and the goal is striving to be better for all not for one.

I see long-term thinking for the generations ahead

Real wealth to me is not getting as big as we can as fast as we can as a society, but rather getting to where we need to be without leaving anyone behind. It’s a shift from viewing others through the lens that life is a competition and success is rated by our job title, what is in our bank account, and what is in our garage. Real wealth means I am engaged in my work because it aligns with my values, that nature isn’t just something that appears when I leave city limits, and that I care about the person I pass on the street. Instead, I recognize it’s not a situation of more for you is less for me, but that equality means we are all wealthier in the long run.

How do we achieve these new economies where we don’t leave others behind? I firmly believe a key component is engaged citizens through democratic self-governance.

Yes, the democratic process can mean decisions can take more time, but I can tell you through my experience working within a financial co-operative that those decisions are different. They are grounded in the people who are impacted by them, and are stronger decisions for this reason. They reflect the needs of the members because they are made by the members.

When we look at our systems in place today, even within democratic governance, we need to improve in ensuring that those who are contributing towards the decisions reflect the population. We know youth are our future therefore investments to educate, mentor, and most importantly to ensure they are contributing to the decisions of today are invaluable. The Co-operators and the Canadian Community Economic Development Network (CCEDNet) are both committed to giving youth, including myself over the last few years, the opportunity to be included and shape the world of tomorrow.

To continue the momentum of New Economy Week I urge you regardless of age to become involved with organizations such as The Co-operators and CCEDNet and spread the word to others to ensure our new economy is one that includes each and every one of us.

Voices of New Economies: Lucy Gao

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This blog is part of the 'Voices of New Economies' series within Cities for People - an experiment in advancing the movement toward urban resilience and livability through connecting innovation networks. This Voices series is collectively curated by One Earth and The Canadian CED Network. We are launching Voices of New Economies as part of New Economy Week 2014, hosted by the New Economy Coalition. Throughout this week, a series of 5 questions guide our exploration of what it would take to build the economy we need - one that works for people, place, and planet.

Today’s Voices story responds to the third question in the New Economy Week series: How can we connect and learn from successful experiments, pilot projects, and campaigns to build broad-based power and effect deep transformation at scale?

Voices of New Economies – An interview with Lucy Gao

By Craig Massey

To sharing economy innovator and collaborativeconsumption.com curator Lucy Gao, real Lucy Gao_Picwealth is immediately definable but altogether intangible. It means having enough money to sustain oneself, but more importantly to sustain relationships with friends and family. It means having the opportunity to do things that challenge you, and pursue goals and mastery. It means being able to embrace life experiences, like going to a park and enjoying the city.

Lucy's fascination with (and admirable dedication to) the sharing economy in Toronto emerged from watching a TED talk by Rachel Botsman that made the case for collaborative consumption. It just made sense. As she researched these new business models, she realized they addressed many of the discrepancies she had witnessed between her studies in political science and business. They were solving real problems.

Inspired, Lucy took the four months she had free after university to join the small team preparing to launch Unstash, a peer-to-peer lending platform. This was an education in marketing and using social media to promote the platform, while making sure the supply (of shareables) existed before the demand. Through this project she networked with players in the new economies locally in Toronto as well as globally. This led to attending OuiShare Fest in France and an invitation to be a curator for collaborativeconsumption.com. From this position, Lucy broadened the reach/strength of the local Toronto sharing economy including through Meetups and events.

What do you see as the key elements of "new economies"?

  • Systems that promote peer-to-peer (p2p) interactions.
  • Creating small neighbourhood-level connections rather than centralized and corporate systems.
  • Access rather than ownership.
  • Enhancing the reality of people's lives, while making services available to community members with low incomes.
  • Empower people to “be their own business.”
  • Enabled by technology, enterprising individuals can reach others interested in what they already have.

How do you think we can connect and learn from successful experiments, pilot projects, and campaigns to build broad-based power and effect deep transformation at scale?

This will be achieved by adding structure to our current networks and enabling current players to reach out to other groups more easily. This will allow easier replication while we share what we have learned. It will also be important to take a more proactive approach with government regulation and building their buy-in. Once we have defined who the new companies are, we can work to help create a new set of regulations. Government involvement can increase the impact of companies that already exist.

Related links:

Rachel Botsman on TED: The Case for Collaborative Consumption

Shareable – Sharing Cities Network – Toronto

Collaborative Living blog

collaborativeconsumption.com

See also previous Cities for People events and blogs on the Sharing Economy including:

Global Mapjam - October 13th - Put the New Economy on the Map

April Rinne - Collaborative Economy - Cross-Canada Tour

What Bike Sharing Says about Our Cities and our Values

When fruit and sharing come together everyone wins

The City that Shares: Vancouver & The Sharing Project

The Sharing Economy: It's more than we think

Gifting Circles and the Gift Economy

Voices of New Economies: Vanessa Timmer

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This blog is part of the 'Voices of New Economies' series within Cities for People - an experiment in advancing the movement toward urban resilience and livability through connecting innovation networks. This Voices series is collectively curated by One Earth and The Canadian CED Network. We are launching Voices of New Economies as part of New Economy Week 2014, hosted by the New Economy Coalition. Throughout this week, a series of 5 questions guide our exploration of what it would take to build the economy we need - one that works for people, place, and planet.

Today’s Voices story responds to the second question in the New Economy Week series: How can we catalyze public conversation about the need for systemic change and the viability of economic alternatives that put people and the planet first?

Economies on One Earth

By Vanessa Timmer, Executive Director, One Earth; Curator, New Economies, Cities for People

Finding a name for a nonprofit leads to some serious and playful conversations.  In 2006, four co-founders and I brainstormed until Bill Rees suggested One Earth.  The name resonated - coming home to our incredible living planet.  Re-discovering the wealth in the living systems of which we are a part and revealing our global interdependence.

Our economies shape our relationships with nature and with each other - and we are the designers of these relationships.  Real wealth comes from designing economies to preserve clean air, clean water, healthy food and ecosystems, energy, shelter, love, and purpose for all species now and into the future. It is not about continuing to consume more and more and to produce more and more waste in ways that lack resilience and are unfair, undemocratic and unsustainable.

The good news is that positive and healthy economic alternatives already exist and are actively being further explored and tested. I am inspired by our endless human imagination in advancing fundamental systemic change.

There are many key elements of new economies and here are three that can spark public conversations:

  1. Slowing down and taking the long-view: In new economies we know when short-term and a vibrant pace is appropriate, and when a measured pace and long-term approach guides better decisions.  By slowing down, we can quiet the constant drive for more and listen to each other and to nature as we develop solutions.  We correct our pervasive short-termism in order to recognize that long-run and long-lag problems (as Jamais Cascio rightly notes) require us to lengthen our decision-making perspective and adopt a resilient and adaptive approach.
  2. Tracking the numbers: New economies are designed with evidence-based feedback loops. We want to know, and not assume, that our actions are leading to increases in and maintenance of the things we want (e.g., community, resilience, healthy ecosystems) and reductions in the things we don’t want (e.g., inequality, waste, toxins). By tracking the numbers, we can catch undermining effects – such as increasing efficiency in cars and then polluting the same amount by driving more – and focus on implementing transformative long-lasting solutions – such as designing walkable cities.
  3. Diverse designers, especially vulnerable peoples: It matters who is at the table in shaping the alternatives to our current economic challenges. Those who have vested interests in maintaining dysfunctional aspects of our current economy are not well-placed to explore other options.  Those who are most vulnerable and marginalized hold critical perspectives and capacities that open up possibilities for just, equitable and restorative economies.  In fact, we need a variety of voices - redesigning new economies is about creating collaborations across unlikely allies including between grassroots movements and the mainstream.

The following are just a few of the many resources that provide further insight into the shape of new economies:

I join others in conserving the structures, behaviors, and values that align with new economies and transforming those that are dysfunctional. This requires us to apply a systems approach, to connect and build bridges across movements in order to amplify our work, and to promote positive visions of better futures to make sustainable livelihoods attractive, and inspire the world to think and act as one Earth.

 

 

Voices of New Economies: Carol Anne Hilton

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This blog is the first of the 'Voices of New Economies' series within Cities for People - an experiment in advancing the movement toward urban resilience and livability through connecting innovation networks. This Voices series is collectively curated by One Earth and The Canadian CED Network. We are launching Voices of New Economies as part of New Economy Week 2014, hosted by the New Economy Coalition. Throughout this week, a series of 5 questions guide our exploration of what it would take to build the economy we need - one that works for people, place, and planet.

Today’s Voices story celebrates Indigenous People’s Day, with author Carol Anne Hilton responding to the first question in the New Economy Week series: How can we honour and learn from the rich histories of communities building New Economy institutions on the frontlines of fights for racial, economic, environmental justice?

Indigenomics - The Case of the Missing Economy

By Carol Anne Hilton                                                                                         CarolAnneHiltonPic

The invisible thread that ties the development of Canada and our current economy plays out daily in the story of the First Nation relationship in the Canadian media. These pivotal moments can support the opportunity for our continued definition of modernity, to right our past relationship, and to define our current relationship.

My work in Indigenomics acts as a vehicle for understanding, creating meaning and expressing our indigenous relationship to economies. First Nations are defining our modern presence and our need to delineate our future through participation in the Canadian economy. With the recent win of the Tsilhqot'in Decision, and numerous other court rulings such as the Nuu chah Nulth case, the re-definition of wealth within the economic system of this country through the First Nation relationship is emerging.  What is directly in front of us is the question “What new thinking is now required of us?”

First Nations consent and insight into the decision-making process of regional and global economies is an essential part of this process.  The legal and economic context is directly related, while never mistaking the role of justice as a pillar of humanity.

This time calls on us to be asking the difficult questions while exploring the discomfort zone of a colonial legacy. In the context of Indigenomics, three essential elements of new economies are:

  • Strengthened relationships;
  • Deeper purpose and relevance to the future;
  • Collaborative shift in measurement of new economies.

Never in the history of humanity has there been this opportunity to redefine economies. What a beautiful opportunity to re-define wealth!  We cannot have a meaningful conversation if all participants do not understand the language and dimension of this economic relationship. The time is now to build a collective toolbox to fill with our deepest questions - to find out why, how, and what is possible in the search for deeper meaning and relevance to new economies.

Toolbox Content

These topics are a key starting point of bridging understanding and context.  Whatever you name the new economies - Purpose, Circular, Collaborative, Sharing -  we need to be aware of who is at the table, and who must be included. What is being named here is a value set - an outline of purpose of how we experience economies. This is the shift to connectivity, to local relationships. I recently met a mayor of a small town who told me that since the establishment as a municipality, not one single mayor had ever set foot on the local reserve. He crossed the line equipped with the question- “What can we do together?”

It's time to cross the fabricated lines and start a new relationship of working together - the heart of our work in New Economies.

The story the Canadian media tells about this economic relationship leaves far too much room for uninformed opinion - the smallest unit of measurement.  The real measurement is the shift towards impact. What is emerging today, people are simply expecting more of our economies.  It is time to move beyond fear.  Lets have the courage to do this together - all my relations.

 

New Economy Week 2014

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What would it take to build the economy we need, one that works for people, place, and planet?

New Economy Week is a public exploration of creative resistance – an opportunity to shine a light on the thousands upon thousands of efforts that everyday people are making right now to build a new kind of economy. 

From October 13-19, the New Economy Coalition (NEC) will be hosting live keynote panels, publishing powerful essays, and spotlighting member events (open-houses, info-sessions, film screenings, panel discussions, pot-lucks, etc.) from across the US and Canada — with the goal of raising the profile of those doing this work and diving into some of the questions that stand between us and a New Economy.

NEC has partnered with YES! Magazine online to share some of the best responses to their 'questions of the day':

1. How can we honor and learn from the rich histories of communities building New Economy institutions on the frontlines of fights for racial, economic, and environmental justice?

2. How can we catalyze public conversation about the need for systemic change and the viability of economic alternatives that put people and the planet first?

3. How can we connect and learn from successful experiments, pilot projects, and campaigns to build broad-based power and effect deep transformation at scale?

4. How do we transition to a renewable economy without leaving the workers, young people, and communities most impacted by extractive industries behind?

5. How can we support neighborhoods, cities, towns, and regions as the fertile ground for the kind of economy we need?

Get Involved!

We invite you to join these conversations online and to host some conversations of your own in your community.

‘At the Centre of Our Moment in History’ – Highlights from the CommonBound Conference

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By: Michael Toye, Executive Director, CCDNET
Cross-Posted from the Canadian Community Economic Development Network blog

You may have seen from some of our 15th anniversary blog posts that the concept and practice of community economic development originated in the United States. 

Although the tools and strategies for creating inclusive and sustainable communities are constantly evolving differently in different places, the values and principles guiding those efforts remain remarkably perennial. 

Those tools and strategies are constantly evolving because CCEDNet members, being a pragmatic bunch, tend to be continually learning, innovating and building on what works to enhance their impact and improve community well being. 

But in recent years, we have increasingly realized that CED alone is not enough to create the inclusive and sustainable communities our members' seek.  We need to be part of a bigger framework for systems change, and a broader coalition to make that happen. 

So it perhaps shouldn't be surprising that when the mainly-US New Economy Coalition (NEC) formed last year, we immediately saw many similarities in vision and a parallel evolution of thinking.  We were pleased when they agreed to accept a Canadian member, and when their President, Bob Massie, came and gave a rousing talk at a reception for CCEDNet members during the Social Enterprise World Forum last fall.  The significance of this connection is reflected in our 2013 Annual Report.

With that background, hopes were high for NEC's first conference and Annual General Meeting that took place over the past weekend in Boston.  The ambitious program included two sessions we had proposed, one by Mike Lewis from the Canadian Centre for Community Renewal on scaling up community economic development to co-operative economic democracy and one by Béatrice Alain from the Chantier de l'économie sociale on the history and success of Québec's social economy.  But those were just 2 of 46 (!) remarkable workshops with something for just about everyone. 

The diversity of perspectives and insights in the plenary panels and workshops was outstanding.  To give just one example, in the opening plenary, Ed Whitfield of the Fund for Democratic Communities went beyond his powerful critique of the 'Teach a Man to Fish' parable to the illustrative 'Teach a Man to Ham Sandwich', drawing on the philosophy and social analysis of James Brown. I encourage you to skim through the program to see the titles of the other plenary sessions and workshops. 

Among the 650 participants, there were a good number of Canadians present, many of whom gathered on the grass outside the main plenary hall for our regional caucus on Saturday afternoon to share resources and ideas.

The opportunity to meet in person so many people I know only by name (and so many others I should) is one of the best parts of these events like this.  I was amazed when on the first day, Clare Goff of New Start Magazine in the UK happened to sit down at my table – after we had first met by phone just a month earlier for an interview

The New Economy Coalition is still in its early stages.  But if the people at this conference are any indication, Bob was exactly right when he described the NEC as a "vast and diverse force for transformation operating at the centre of our moment in history."  We are #CommonBound for a very promising future.

Congratulations especially to the extraordinary NEC staff team who pulled an amazing conference together, and the many others who helped make it happen. 

Our friends at The Extraenvironmentalist were livestreaming the conference, so at some point there should be more video available, but in the meantime check out some tweets for a sense of what happened.

(@NewEconomics, #CommonBound, @CCEDNet_RCDEC)

Livestream: New Economy Coalition CommonBound Gathering: Watch it live June 6-8!

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Hundreds of the people and organizations who are working to build a new economy will converge this June 6th - 8th at CommonBound: a gathering hosted by the New Economy Coalition in Boston, MA.

To provide global access to the talks, workshops, distinguished leaders, activists and practitioners at CommonBound, The Extraenvironmentalist, a Vancouver, BC based media not-for-profit The Extraenvironmentalist, will be live broadcasting conference sessions and interviews through a livestream on the CommonBound website at http://commonbound.org/register.

Speakers from Canada include Beatrice Alice of Chantier de l'economie sociale, Mike Lewis of the Canadian Centre for Community Renewal and Mike Toye of the Canadian Community Economic Development Network (CCEDnet).

Tune in to hear the latest ideas and developments in new economies from across North America!

Find out about new economies by reading this blog post here.

Photo credit: Creative Commons license - Boston, MA /via Flickr user robdebsgreen