Global #MapJam 2014 to Put the New Economy on the Map!

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On October 13th, the Sharing Cities Network will launch the Second Annual Global #MapJam to bring activists together in cities around the world to map grassroots sharing projects, cooperatives, community resources, and the commons where they live.

Mapping all of the shared resources in your city not only shows that another world is possible--it shows it’s already here! Asset maps are powerful organizing tools. They make community assets more visible, create a base for further community development, spark new collaborations, and illuminate openings for new projects to fill in the gaps. They also get a lot of web traffic! Depending on the size of your city, your map could easily get thousands of visits in just a few months after creating it.

Scheduled to coincide with New Economy Week, the Map Jam will launch on Indigenous People’s Day and continue for two weeks from Monday, October 13th - Sunday, the 27th.

Global #MapJam Day will take place on October 16th featuring a 24hr mapping ‘round the world across multiple continents and timezones

The second annual asset mapping event will build upon the tremendous success of last years campaign when 500 mappers partied together in 60 cities and made 50 maps in just 2 weeks launching the Sharing Cities Network in the process. Groups in many cities have already begun to step up and are planning to host #MapJams in Barcelona, Frankfurt, Hartford, Louisville, Nairobi and Rochester just to name a few and many groups from last year will be coming back together… who knew that mapping could be so much fun?

The #MapJam has received a broad base of support led by the Sharing Cities Network  and partners including: New Economy Coalition,US Solidarity Economy Network,Transition US,Center for a New American Dream,OuiShare,P2P Foundation,Post Carbon Institute,The People Who Share,Students Organizing for Democratic Alternatives,Solidarity NYC,Data Commons,  RIPESS (International Network for the Promotion of Social Solidarity Economy) and many other community and Sharing Cities groups.

Interested in organizing a #MapJam in your community? Or attending one? Please sign up here to get involved.

#MapJam’s are easy to organize and a small, dedicated group of people can get together for a few hours to map as many shared resources, cooperatives and sharing services in their city or town as possible. Like a musical jam, it should be fun, social, and jammers should find a groove as they work. Join the Sharing Cities Network facebook group to get the latest updates and meet other ‘map jammers’.

Join us to Put the New Economy on the Map!

Sign up now to host a #MapJam and you will be provided with a comprehensive Guide to Mapping, Webinar, Q&A/Support Calls and Promotional Materials to support the success of your local event.

Artist Roundtable with Mark Prier

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Mark Prier, artist
John English, historian
Rosemarie De Clerck-Floate, scientist
and Gordon Knox, museum director

Thursday, September 11, 7pm
MusagetesOffice @ 6 Dublin Street South, Guelph
Free admission

Are you curious about what goes on behind the scenes when an artist develops a project? Are you keen to discover how art can connect the dots between many diverse fields? Ever wondered how an artistic project can contribute to social change or how social change can influence art? Perhaps you are an artist who wants to expand the scope of your own practice, an inquisitive soul researching interdisciplinarity, or a creative type who is thinking deeply about resilience. The Artist Roundtable is a new way for folks like you to explore these questions.

On September 11 at 7pm Musagetes is hosting the first of a series of international roundtables in which artists can share their ideas and projects with scientists, historians, Aboriginal leaders, policymakers, politicians, community organizers, and social movement leaders. This inauagural roundtable will feature Mark Prier, a Mississauga-based multimedia artist, who will present his ecological, species-based projects to a panel of respondents. His ongoing project, Grey County Pastoral: Proton Township Exclosure, is a living installation that attempts to restore a historically-documented forest in southern Ontario on one acre of land. Prier creates miniature, nearly virtual versions of the history of our natural environment, letting us experience what our region was like before settlers colonized the land. Prier has a particular interest in forest ecologies and the dynamic between native and invasive species in Ontario. The Artist Roundtable is a chance to dig deeper into this artist’s process and project development.

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Grey County Pastoral: Proton Township Exclosure, 2012-present. Image credit: Mark Prier

Taking inspiration from the UN Climate Summit set to begin on September 23 in New York, the roundtable discussion will focus on aspects of climate change, an interest of Mark Prier our three respondents:

  • John English is an historian, author, former politician, and expert on international affairs. He recently published Ice and Water, a history of the Arctic Council.
  • Rosemarie De Clerck-Floate is an entomologist and biocontrol scientist based in Lethbridge, Alberta.
  • Gordon Knox is the director of the Arizona State University Art Museum, former director of the Stanford Humanities Lab, and an expert on artist residencies internationally.

These four roundtable participants will engage in a conversation that takes its cue from a presentation of Prier’s past and ongoing projects. The evening event will be moderated by Jeanne Wikler, a New York-based expert on cultural diplomacy and an artist coach who enables artists to take their work into new and unusual forums. Wikler was recently the Dutch cultural attaché to New York (2001-2007) and to Paris (2009-2013).

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Survival Walk (performance), 2008. Photo Credit: Philip Norman Robbins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Musagetes developed this Artist Roundtable approach in collaboration with Todd Lester, a New York and São Paulo-based artist and activist who has dedicated his career to supporting and enabling socially engaged artists around the world. He is a senior fellow at the World Policy Institute (where he made the Arts-Policy Nexus) and founder of both freeDimensional and Lanchonete.org, an experimental artist engagement program and cooperative restaurant in São Paulo.

The Artist Roundtable is an experiment of Musagetes and Cities for People. The co-creative team—which includes cheyanne turions, Musagetes, Todd Lester, and Ryan Doherty—is curating a program of activities in Guelph Area and Lethbridge. Cities for People understands each city to be a unique ecosystem, and like any ecosystem, a city’s strength and resilience depends on its ability to nurture the full diversity of its inhabitants and give them what they need not just to survive, but thrive. Cities For People sees every city as an invitation: an invitation for interaction, innovation, change, inclusion, learning, love and growth; an invitation to come up with new ways to make the cities we live in support how we would like to live. We invite you to deepen this conversation about cities and resilience with us at the Artist Roundtable.

Mark Prier’s multimedia art examines the interaction between culture, ecology, and survival. Working from diverse sources, such as folklore, geology, history, and botany, he rearticulates this examination into various media, including installation, new media, performance, sound, and video. His exhibitions include shows in Canada (The Rooms, Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre, White Water Gallery, Contemporary Art Forum Kitchener & Area), Mexico (Kunsthaus Santa Fé), United Kingdom (the Lost O), and the United States (City Without Walls, and [Untitled] Artspace). He has received grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, the Newfoundland & Labrador Arts Council, and the Ontario Arts Council. In 2008, he travelled to Gotland, Sweden for the Brucebo Summer Residency; and, in 2012, he travelled to Crowsnest Pass, Alberta for Trap/door Artist-Run Centre’s Gushul Studio & Collaboration Residency. A 2004 graduate of University of Toronto’s Visual Studies program, Prier also took part in HotBox Riverwood’s mentorship program with Reinhard Reitzenstein in 2011. As half of the electronica duo hellothisisalex, Prier has played the MUTEK Festival in Montreal, done commissions for CBC Radio, and taken part in the National Film Board of Canada’s Minus 40 project.

Musagetes is an international organization that strives to make the arts more central and meaningful in peoples' lives, in our communities, and in our societies. Musagetes works in Guelph, Sudbury, Lecce (Italy), and Rijeka (Croatia) to demonstrate how art can be participatory and socially engaged, to establish a greater sense of belonging in communities. 

July 17th is #iCollday!

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OuiShare is proud to be organizing their second International Collaboration Day this month, with over 45 co-working spaces hosting open co-working days and talks about connecting and collaborating. Join the community at events in London, Barcelona, Paris, Cordoba, Sevilla, Valencia, Donostia, Nice, Frankfurt and many more!

iCollDay is a set of globally-connected events – facilitated by co-working spaces – to build collaborative relationships across all sectors and disciplines.

The inaugural iCollDay took place on 16th January 2014 and saw 45 co-working communities in 30 cities from New Zealand to San Fran participate.

>> Add your event here
>> See all events

 

OuiShare is a think and do-tank with the mission to empower citizens, public institutions and companies to create a collaborative economy: an economy based on sharing, collaboration and openness, relying on horizontal networks and communities. Learn more about OuiShare here

 

 Photo Credit: What's Up?

Canada Sharing Economy Roadshow: April Rinne in Toronto

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April Rinne recently participated in a cross-country tour of Canada promoting Shareable Cities, speaking in Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. The tour was co-hosted by Social Innovation Generation (SIG) and Cities for People, a new innovation platform that aims to create more resilient and livable cities, with support from The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation.

photo-2-300x300A key theme throughout the tour was “connecting the dots,” specifically, how cities connect the expertise, resources and assets between government, citizens, entrepreneurs and companies to create a shareable city.

At April’s Toronto pitstop on February 11, she started the day with a workshop attended by city leaders in municipal government, economic and social development and urban planning. Municipal support is crucial for taxation, insurance and other regulatory policy reform which can help sharing systems flourish.

In the afternoon, April attended an ideation session with entrepreneurs, key leaders and enthusiasts in the Toronto sharing economy. Attendees included the Toronto Tool Library, Trade School Toronto, Etsy Canada, and Repair Café Toronto. The goal of this session was to discuss next steps for an expanding Toronto network, one that aims to raise awareness about collaborative consumption to everyday Torontonians.

April’s evening presentation to the public focused on defining the collaborative economy, highlighting examples of cross-sector collaboration and reiterating the importance of connecting the dots. April charismatically described a pair of goggles that would allow us to see idle assets in a city, whether they exist in government, a household or in a company’s supply chain. It’s important that cities unlock the wealth in these assets, which create an abundance of resources that can provide lots of public benefit to citizens.

At one point in April’s lecture, she mentions that Mayor Park Won-Soon of Seoul, South Korea sees a city as a laboratory to hatch ideas and incubate projects, which is the perfect way to describe the task at hand for cities now. Cities need to determine what platforms resonate with the needs of their citizens and create pilot programs and start taking action. In doing so, they can create an enabling environment to make sharing more mainstream and transform their local communities.

Read about the Vancouver public event here.

Read the blog post "The Sharing Economy: it's more than we think" here

Watch April Rinne’s full presentation:

Video credit: The Collaborative Economy: How sharing is powering a sustainable future – MaRS Global Leadership from MaRS Discovery District on Vimeo.

Credit: Collaborative Lab; posted in Perspectives Videos on by Lucy Gao, Global Curator Team, Canada - twitter

Collaborative Economy Event in Vancouver

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April Rinne, Chief Strategy of Collaborative Lab, was in Vancouver as part of a cross-Canada tour on Thursday 13 February 2014.

April Rinne Speaking 300 Photo Daniel-RotmanAt the public event that evening, she illustrated how the collaborative economy (or "the sharing economy") has the potential to transform the way we design products and services, create sustainable and "shareable" cities, re-imagine public services, reduce waste and connect communities.

Collaborative Consumption and The Sharing Economy: Opportunities for Cities, Organizations, and Well-Being

Featuring April Rinne, Chief Strategy Officer, The Collaborative Lab

RESPONDING PANEL: 
Sadhu Johnston, Deputy City Manager, City of Vancouver
Chris Diplock, Co-Founder, Vancouver Tool Library, Lead Researcher, The Sharing Project (learn more about The Sharing Project here)
Hilary Henegar, Marketing Director, Modo - The Car Co-op

In Vancouver, April’s visit was hosted by One Earth as part of Cities for People, with partners including Vancity, The Sharing Project, Modo The Car Co-op, City of Vancouver, The HiVE, CityStudio, Board of Change, Village Vancouver, Share Shed, Pogoride, Ashoka, The Extraenvironmentalist, BC Partners for Social Impact and other local partners. Her national speaking tour is co-sponsored by Social Innovation April Rinne 300 Photo Daniel-RotmanGeneration (SiG). Vanessa Timmer (One Earth) and Tim Draimin (SiG) - pictured at the right - joined April across the country.

Read about the Toronto public event here.

Read the blog post "The Sharing Economy: it's more than we think" here.

Watch the video recording of April Rinne's Vancouver public event in Vancouver, recorded at The Hive on 13 February 2013 by The Extraenvironmentalist:

Photo credits: Daniel Rotman 2014

The Sharing Economy: It’s more than we think

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There is a good chance that you’ve heard about “The Sharing Economy”.  It’s drawing attention because of innovations such as peer-to-peer sharing among neighbours including tool libraries and business-to-consumer enterprises including AirBnB.  Instead of keeping our focus here, we can widen our view and find an entire universe of social innovations.  These innovations have the potential to connect us to each other, lessen our impact on the Earth, and experiment with new business models.do-you-like-to-share--300x180

Sharing has always been a part of city life including through libraries, community spaces, guilds, and civic structures. In the past decade, there has been a revival and acceleration in sharing innovations across sectors from mobility (Bixie Bikes, Coop Cars) to accommodation (AirBnB, coachsurfing) to skills (TaskRabbit). Businesses are sharing idle supply chain capacity and joining forces in collective institutional purchasing, and community-based grassroots innovators are creating neighbourhood community time banks and clothing swaps.

“Sharing cars, books, tools can also be expanded to shared, community-owned energy; shared 3D printing facilities; and communal office spaces. Shared ideas, green space, seeds, air, and water have been with us since we set foot on the earth but need protecting.”
– Mike Childs1

“The sharing economy can be manifest in almost every sector of society and corner of the globe. Sectors which have experienced robust traction and interest include accommodation, transportation, tourism, office space, financial services and retail products. Areas where significant growth is expected include [peer to peer] P2P car sharing, ridesharing, errand marketplaces, P2P and social lending, and product rental.”
– Young Global Leaders Sharing Economy Working Group2

Also known as collaborative consumption and the collaborative economy, the Sharing Economy is the bartering, exchanging, sharing, renting, trading, borrowing, lending, leasing and swapping of goods, services, time, capital, experiences and space by individuals, institutions, businesses and communities.  This is all being supported by new mobile and digital technologies and online platforms that redistribute and enable transactions based on trust and reciprocity. It is motivated by the realities of the economic crisis and financial hardship, growing urbanization, resource and energy constraints, and inequitable access to resources.3

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Clothing swap hosted by sharing community, peers.org

There are opportunities to unlock idling capacity – the untapped social, economic, and environmental value of underutilized assets.  For some this is heralded as indicative of a changing relationship with material possessions and a rejection of mass consumption through a shift from ownership to access; however, others question whether the mainstream is willing to make this shift. What we do know is that when a community shares more, it consumes less material and energy.  The purchase of one 10 pound circular saw at the Vancouver Tool Library is estimated to have prevented up to 320 pounds of waste.  Although as Rachel Botsman notes, the Sharing Economy Lacks A Shared Definition, its promise lies in the possibility of reductions and more efficient use of resources and untapped and idle capacities, opportunities for local and inclusive economies, and greater social connectivity and trust.

Though the Sharing Economy holds much promise for creating social innovations, it’s important to consider who is benefitting from these new models of sharing. The successful growth of sharing businesses like Airbnb and Lyft clearly indicate the economic value of the movement. What is less understood is the social benefits that are created by the Sharing Economy for vulnerable populations. One of the greatest aspirations of the Collaborative Economy is to form a more inclusive society. Monitoring the impacts of sharing on low-income groups can help realize this vision.

An Expanding Universe of Sharing

 ”‘Sharing and shareability’ are typically too narrowly conceived and perceived. The opportunity is so much greater than middle-class ‘swishing’ and even though urban bike-sharing schemes have dominated news in this space, whether in London, Copenhagen, Paris or Montreal, or Rio, Guadalajara (México), Buenos Aires, or Providencia (Chile), sharing is definitely about much more than ‘bums on bikes.’”
– Julian Agyeman, Duncan McLaren and Adrianne Schaefer-Borrego4

We are missing some key aspects of the Collaborative and the Sharing Economy such as business to business sharing, informal sharing among immigrant, isolated or marginalized communities, and activities in unexpected sectors such as within the arts.

So how can we widen our view?  We can explore the what, who and how of the sharing economy:

  • WHAT

    The universe of sharing crosses many areas of our lives including transportation, food, space, funding, and goods.  It’s quite different if we are sharing things (books, cars, art), services (rides, child care, time) or experiences (skill sharing). There are also varying types of ownership – some sharing innovations are public, some private and others are cooperative.

  • WHO

    Most attention has been on individual peer-to-peer sharing (e.g., bartering networks like Swapsity.ca) and business to consumer enterprises (e.g., Zipcar).  Sharing is also taking place among businesses (e.g., Liquidspace and horizontal collaboration across supply chains) and within communities (e.g., Tool Libraries, Cooperatives). We can also explore the diversity of networks emerging to support sharing innovators (Shareable.net, Collaborative Lab, Peers).

  • HOW

    The way we share also varies from money exchanges to non-monetized transactions, formal and informal innovations, and socially connected and more impersonal interactions.

By broadening our definition, it is possible to spark entrepreneurship and social innovation, to anticipate negative reactions and impacts, and to create a more nuanced and vibrant understanding of the Sharing Economy.  This, in turn, can guide the development of pilots, activities and supportive structures and policies.

From 10 – 14 February traveled with April Rinne, Chief Strategy Officer, Collaborative Lab and Tim Draimin, Executive Director, SiG National across Canada on a collaborative economy tour, co-sponsored by SiG and Cities for People.

Photo credit: Daniel Rotman 2014

 


1 Mike Childs (2013) The Power of Sharing: A Call to Action for Environmentalists. 5 November.

2 Young Global Leaders Working Group (2013) Circular Economy Innovation and New Business Models Initiative. Position Paper: World Economic Forum Young Global Leaders Taskforce.

3 Resources: Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers (2012) What’s Mine is Yours; Lisa Gansky (2010) The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing; The Sharing Project Bryan Walsh 10 Ideas That Will Change the World: Today’s Smart Choice: Don’t Own. Share. Time Magazine, 17 March 2011. http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2059521_2059717_2059710,00.html

4 Julian Agyeman, Duncan McLaren and Adrianne Schaefer-Borrego (2013) Briefing: Sharing Cities. Written for Friends of the Earth’s “Big Ideas” project, September.

Credit: Originally posted at SiG Generation on 3 February 2014 by Vanessa Timmer.