Webinar! Voices of New Economies: Opportunity for All

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Date: 

Mon, 9 Nov 2015

Time:

2:30pm Newfoundland, 2pm Atlantic, 1pm Eastern, 12pm Central, 11am Mountain, 10am Pacific

Cost:

Free! Register now.

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Across Canada and around the world, people are rising up to shape new economies.  Recognizing that the ecological, social and even financial costs of our current economic system are unsustainable, innovative leaders are finding different paths forward.

As part of the third annual New Economy Week, this session will challenge us to explore how we can scale promising social innovations towards larger systemic change.

The contributors will share big ideas and concrete examples of real solutions to further explore perspectives that they and others shared in Voices of New Economies, a report produced as part of Cities for People by One Earth and the Canadian CED Network.

The session offers inspiration for new possibilities that can bring us closer to a just, sustainable, and democratic society.

SPEAKERS

Hosted by Dagmar Timmer, Managing Director and Co-Founder of One Earth, the session will begin with an introduction by Michael Toye, executive Director of the Canadian CED Network and Vanessa Timmer, Executive Director and Co-Founder of One Earth. It features insights from the following Voices contributors:

Marianne JurzyniecGovernance Liaison Manager, Affinity Credit Union

"We know youth are our future therefore investments to educate, mentor, and most importantly to ensure they are contributing to the decisions of today are invaluable.”

Sean GeobeySenior Associate, MaRS Solutions Lab

"Wealth comes from our capacity to invest materially, socially, and intellectually in the creation of institutions and infrastructure that support collective efforts to try and make the world a better place.”

Lis Suarez Visbal-Ensink, Executive Director, FEM International and Co-Director, ETHIK BGC

"The capacity to choose what is best for you and yours and embrace it, not to take what you can because it is your only option, or the only thing you can afford.”

Pallavi Roy, Youth Environmental Co-ordinator, CultureLink Settlement Services

"The energy sector, which has traditionally been highly controlled, has immense potential to be revolutionized through new economic practices.”

Victoria WeeComputer Science student, Stanford University

"Young people are the ingredient x to really carving out the future that we want.”

Nabeel AhmedNetwork Co-ordinator, Social Enterprise Toronto

"At the core, new economies have to be focused around people and protecting public interests, not falling prey to short- term, profit-driven private interests."

Alexa Pitoulis, Managing Director, OpenMedia

"How we interact with media has changed dramatically in the last 20 years.  Local ownership and control over Internet infrastructure is a key component to thriving new economies of the future."

LOGISTICS

You will need speakers or a headset on your computer to participate.  To ensure your system will be compatible with our webinar platform, try this connection test or look at the Adobe Connect quick start guide prior to the session.

NOTE: There will also be a French webinar on November 11 Voix de nouvelles économies : occasion pour tous. Visit the event page to register.

New Economies report released!

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One Earth, in collaboration with CCEDNet, has released their Voices of New Economies report, inspired by all those who are rising up to shape new economies that work for people, places, and the planet. The report brings together visually engaging content from the New Economies blog series to map out key ideas, patterns, and perspectives and chart new economic approaches.

The report includes interviews with leaders in the areas of Rethinking our Fundamentals, Healthy Ecosystems & Happy Communities, Building an Inclusive Economy, Tools & Policies to get us there, and New Economies at Work.

“Although the large-scale patterns of economic inequality and inadequate measures continue to prevail, individuals, institutions, and communities around the world are beginning to awaken to a new economic era. This compendium was put together to spark dialogue around the question: What might new economies in the 21st Century look like? The following pages feature the insights of various thought leaders and practitioners from across North America, with backgrounds ranging from policy to computer science to accounting to biology.” - excerpt from the Introduction, written by Jane Zhang.

You can access it in full on Issu - see the link below. And, as part of the ongoing collaboration between One Earth, Musagetes, Adjacent Possibilities, and others, the Artist Round Table (A.RT) on New Economies brought together a diverse group of panellists with provocative ideas about art, economy, and transformative change. Watch a video of the A.RT, hosted at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, here.

Feel free to share the report and video widely!

 

 

New Economies and Community Economic Development: For People, Place and Planet – An interview with Mike Toye

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This blog is part of the 'Voices of New Economies' series within Cities for People - an experiment in advancing the movement toward urban resilience and livability through connecting innovation networks. 

The Voices of New Economies series is collectively curated by One Earth and The Canadian CED Network

This series is an exploration of what it takes to build the economies we need - ones that work for people, places, and the planet. We are connecting key actors, finding patterns, noting interesting differences, and highlighting key concepts and initiatives. Together, this series offers insights into the new economies movement as it develops.

By Jane Zhang Mike Toye

  1. In your view, what are some key elements of "new economies"?
  • Holistic measures of progress: There are many new measures bubbling up (eg. Gross National Happiness), but they need to take a more central place in decision-making, and they need to be refined and expanded in what they measure and how well they measure.
  • Respect natural limits: I see this as one of the central flaws of our current economic system. Environmental goods and their externalized costs are a major blind spot; we need to internalize those costs and respect natural limits, especially in the context of climate change. We have to work with nature, not against it.
  • (Eco)systems thinking: the recognition of the influence of relationships, and that human beings are not only part of the world, but connected to the world. This includes relationships between people and nature, but also between people, including the new connections that technology is facilitating. Taking a systems lens to thinking about economy and society is a foundation for understanding the impacts of decisions and actions.
  • Democratizing the economy & localizing control: New technologies can facilitate crowdsourced investment, connections and participation, but in-person communities, human and social capital are crucial. We are experimenting with the new ways technology allows us to connect, and re-discovering some older wisdom about organizing. The bottom line is that there’s an essential role for human connections in democratizing the economy.
  1. Why is neighbourhood-level development important? 

I think “communities” is the term most often used in CCEDNet, in part because it’s widely applicable, from geographic neighborhoods to communities of identity or interest. A community is a venue for people to get organized, connect and learn about each other, identify shared interests, challenges, opportunities to cooperate, and to change. For example, an immigrant community has specific needs – developing language skills, getting help to reach out to employers or starting businesses – and the foundation is that a community acts as an organizing vehicle to address those needs and create change.

  1. How do these relate to cities? 

Since cities have the highest concentrations of people, they are among the most dynamic places for connections, opportunities, and possibilities to be created. But the way they’ve been built has disconnected us from nature and each other. Cities need to be understood as part of broader regions. We need to recognize urban-rural relationships and the flows of goods and services, including ecological services, that a broader region provides. On the human side, there are many ways that cities can be better designed to deliberately create opportunities for relationships and cooperation, and connect the different spheres of our lives. Much of today's built environment was created when zoning and building practices reflected an older mentality of separation. Integrating systems thinking into the design of cities can create opportunities for people to relate and care for each other better.

  1. What are some major challenges to enhancing sustainable local economies?

In the New Economies world, there is a significant focus on business & finance, with valuable attention paid on growing more blended business models (social enterprises, BCorps, co-ops) and new finance models (impact investing, new types of investment capital, crowdfunding). These are creating lots of local opportunities for transition, which is exciting. However, I'd say there is less attention on places and people, from our angle of community economic development. Ideally, we should be connecting the dots between all four pillars: business, finance, places and people.

Another one of our biggest challenges is communicating these opportunities to a wider audience, both professionals in various sectors and the general public, in a way that is meaningful and engaging.

A good example of a places- and people-centered project is the Quint Development Corporation in Saskatoon, which has a mandate for the city's core neighborhoods. Among the local residents, there is a large Aboriginal population that has particular needs, so the employment and housing opportunities are combined with outreach that is tailored to their needs.

  1. What does real wealth mean to you?

Real wealth means freedom, well-being, and happiness, for current and future generations, and fairly distributed for as many people as possible.

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Michael Toye became Executive Director of CCEDNet in August of 2008, bringing a deep background in community economic development (CED) to the Director's chair. Upon earning his Master of Social Work at McGill, Michael helped set up two worker co-operatives that provide research, consulting and training services related to CED and the social economy. Michael's involvement with CCEDNet dates back to 2000 when he helped organize CCEDNet's National Policy Forum while serving as a coordinator with the Coopérative de consultation en développement La Clé.

More recently Michael has deepened his knowledge of Canadian social policy and parliamentary process serving as a policy analyst at the Library of Parliament in Ottawa, while teaching courses on CED and social enterprise at Concordia University. Michael has written a number of articles and other publications on CED and the social economy, including co-editing the book, Community Economic Development: Building for Social Change.

Livestream: New Economy Coalition CommonBound Gathering: Watch it live June 6-8!

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Hundreds of the people and organizations who are working to build a new economy will converge this June 6th - 8th at CommonBound: a gathering hosted by the New Economy Coalition in Boston, MA.

To provide global access to the talks, workshops, distinguished leaders, activists and practitioners at CommonBound, The Extraenvironmentalist, a Vancouver, BC based media not-for-profit The Extraenvironmentalist, will be live broadcasting conference sessions and interviews through a livestream on the CommonBound website at http://commonbound.org/register.

Speakers from Canada include Beatrice Alice of Chantier de l'economie sociale, Mike Lewis of the Canadian Centre for Community Renewal and Mike Toye of the Canadian Community Economic Development Network (CCEDnet).

Tune in to hear the latest ideas and developments in new economies from across North America!

Find out about new economies by reading this blog post here.

Photo credit: Creative Commons license - Boston, MA /via Flickr user robdebsgreen